learning taking into account the paragraph on education below;

When the Constitution was amended in 1915 this measure
was included in the paragraph on education, and it was again
included in the new Constitution of June 1953.

Write a short paragraph on Education since Independence

2000-2005 in the paragraph on education, reference is made to a portrayal of man

257 words short paragraph on Education in India

The oldest written constitution still in use in the world today is the Constitution of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, drafted by John Adams in 1778, just two years after the Declaration of Independence and fully a decade before our national Constitution. In many respects it is a rough draft of our national Constitution. But it also contains a paragraph on education that was without precedent. Though Adams worried that it would be rejected as too radical, it was passed unanimously. Listen, please, to what it says:

(1948) paragraph on education (26) does not refer to language at all

Under the Constitution of June sth, 1849, which came after the end of the absolute monarchy and by which a parliament was set up, free tuition was secured for all children whose parents could not pay for their education (Article 90). This paragraph seems to have been left out of the original draft for the constitution,which was made by D. G. Monrad, who was one of the most outstanding leaders of the Liberals and who became a member of the first constitutional cabinet as Minister of Education from March to November 1848. Apparently he was content with the regulations given in the Education Acts of July 1814, by which instruction was already free to children in elementary schools although, as far as Copenhagen was concerned, limited to the poor. In his opinion there was no need for further regulations. His colleague, Orla Lehmann, a Cabinet Minister without portfolio, but the most enthusiastic of the Liberal leaders, diverged on this point. He took upon himself to complete the draft for the Constitution, and it appears from his posthumous papers, still in the Public Record Office, that it was he who took the initiative in adding a paragraph on education. His purpose was to secure liberty in education and the right to free instruction. The latter point was agreed to by the Liberal majority of the Cabinet although, as in Copenhagen, it was limited to such children whose parents were supposed not to have the means to pay. The former point deviated from the traditionsof the Education Acts of 1814, which stipulated that attendanceat public elementary schools should be compulsory to all children from the age af 7 to the time of their confirmation, unless they were taught at home or in private schools, and such instructionwas approved beforehand by the county authorities. Although a transfer of responsibility from the state to the parents accorded with Liberal doctrines, Lehmann's suggestions were not supported by his colleagues. His suggestions appear to have been deleted in the draft. Monrad is undoubtedly responsible for this deletion. As a member of the Copenhagen Board of Education from 1842 to 1846 he had been faced by the same problem. The former absolutisticgovernment had, in 1842, submitted an amendment to the Education Act, as far as the capital was concerned, in which compulsory school attendance was retained. Monrad had consideredthe problem and investigated the matter on a study tour in 1842 and 1843 to Berlin, Dresden, Leipzig, Frankfurt, Cologne, Leyden, The Hague and London. The result he came to was that

But it also contains a paragraph on education that was without precedent
Lewis concluded his first essay in The Abolition of Man with my favourite paragraph on education

Paragraph on Importance of Education in our Life

In the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), for instance, the paragraph on education (26) does not refer to language at all; in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966), the educational Article (13) omits reference to language or linguistic groups (which are mentioned in its general Article 2.2)…in the European Charter for Regional or Minority languages [1998], the formulations in the education Article 8 include a range of modifications. Just as in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious, and Linguistic Minorities, the opt-outs and alternatives permit a reluctant state to meet the requirements in a minimalist way. (Magga and Skutnabb-Kangas 2001)

(Relevant legislation and guidance) paragraph on Education & Inspections Act (2006)

Education plays an important role in shaping an individual’s career

For the maintenance and development of languages (and thereby linguistic diversity on earth), educational language rights, including the right to mother-tongue-medium education, are absolutely vital. Binding linguistic human rights (education rights in particular) might be one of the necessary (but not sufficient) ways of counteracting linguicide and linguicism. Unfortunately, today there is no proper basis in international law for these rights to be implemented (see the overviews and analyses in Skutnabb-Kangas & Phillipson, Eds., 1994 and Skutnabb-Kangas, 2000). When we move from the non-duty-inducing human rights instrument preambles about the importance of languages to their binding clauses -- especially to the educational clauses -- language often disappears completely. In the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (1948), for instance, the paragraph on education (26) does not refer to language at all; in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (1966), the educational Article (13) omits reference to language or linguistic groups (which are mentioned in its general Article 2.2). If language-related rights are included and specified, the articles dealing with these rights are typically so weak and unsatisfactory as to be virtually meaningless. For instance, in the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages (in force since 1998; Norway, Sweden, and Finland have ratified it for the Saami), the formulations in the education Article 8 include a range of modifications. Just as in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Persons Belonging to National or Ethnic, Religious, and Linguistic Minorities, the opt-outs and alternatives permit a reluctant state to meet the requirements in a minimalist way. A state may claim, for instance, that a provision was not "possible" or "appropriate," or that numbers were not "sufficient" or did not "justify" a provision, or that it "allowed" the minority to organise teaching of their language as a subject, at their own cost.

That paragraph on education reminds me of something you posted in 05 or 06

It ends, not when he graduate from the university, but at this death

His paragraph on education can stand as a summary of his general approach to Christian education: “Education for the 1990s must have an increasing focus on the way of peace (Shalom). The biblical doctrine of Shalom includes a variety of related beliefs. All people are to be valued. All are to participate actively in creative change. We can recognize the creative possibilities in conflict. All are to care for world resources. The interconnections of the network of the whole human community are to be discovered and celebrated. We are to live toward a vision of the unity of God’s power and love. All of these together make up the way of peace. Congregational education must focus even more intensely on these various dimensions of the way of Shalom” (Miller, “Shape of Congregational Education,” 1986, 40).