“The Odd Couple” female version by Dramatic License Productions

The same might be said of Dramatic License Productions' hilarious rendition of the show, which plays hard for laughs, serving up reheated white-trash stereotypes and a plot as thin as the strawberry syrup at IHOP. But like any good waffle bar, walking away is easier said than done. The show is an unabashed buffet, both salty and sweet, and while it definitely satisfies those twin cravings of the American diet, its empty calories may leave you feeling bloated when it comes time for the check.

“The Odd Couple” female version by Dramatic License Productions

Dramatic License's next production is actually derived from a play about men.

Teresa DoggettPhoto by John LambDramatic License Productions

Of course Shakespeare took massive dramatic license – he was the Tudor PR machine, used to legitimise and strengthen their claim to the throne. Bendy, please stop stating the obvious trying to make yourself look like a clever clogs.

Dramatic license definition by Babylon’s free dictionary

For almost an hour and a half the audience is spellbound by two of St. Louis’ greatest actors bringing the touching story of “Tuesdays With Morrie” to life on the unusual mall theatre stage at Dramatic License Productions. Jeffrey Hatcher’s touching adaptation of Mitch Albom’s book brings tears of laughter, joy and sorrow as we see how a professor can bring a selfish sports journalist to his knees with the power of kindness and generosity.

Dramatic License plans to run with that ball, through several kinds of presentations.
Translation is tricky business. The translator has to transform the foreign to the familiar while moving and pleasing his or her audience. Louise Ladouceur knows theatre from a multi-dimensional perspective that gives her research a particular authority as she moves between two of the dominant cultures of Canada: French and English. Through the analysis of six plays from each linguistic repertoire, written and translated between 1961 and 2000, her award-winning book compares the complexities of a translation process shaped by the power struggle between Canada's two official languages. The winner of the Prix Gabrielle-Roy and the Ann Saddlemyer Book Award, Dramatic Licence addresses issues important to scholars and students of Translation Studies, Canadian Literature and Theatre Studies, as well as theatre practitioners and translators.This is a very funny show, reflecting the importance of friendships among women, as well as the need for individual independence. I find the characters of Florence and Olive easier to relate to than their male counterparts, and even though the male version of this show is more famous, I think I actually prefer this version. It’s been given a lively and hilarious production at Dramatic License Productions that’s well worth seeing.When Peter Pan asks audiences to affirm their belief in fairies in order to revive Tinker Bell, this can be interpreted as an affirmation of the willing suspension of disbelief thought to be an essential condition of theatrical spectating. However, closer analysis of the original 1904 production of Peter Pan, including its variation from conventional pantomime, reveals the intertext of two contemporaneous debates in ethnology: the idea that the last of the fairy folk were departing from Britain, and the more empirical observation that gypsy-tinkers were losing their rural way of life. This reveals Peter Pan's query as a reflection about the status of oppressed groups, and thus less an affirmation of innocence than a referendum on the desirability of modernity. This case study is postulated as an example of dramatic license—a previously under-theorized concept—proposing this as a term with specific referentiality to the theatrical medium, in which a mimetic, intellectual, and ideological problem is explicitly placed before an audience in order to elicit a response. The Odd Couple (Female Version)
by Neil Simon
Directed by Alan Knoll
Dramatic License Productions
April 25, 2015
Furlow wants her company’s new focus to spread beyond the Dramatic License stage.

What is a dramatic license? | ChaCha

When Peter Pan asks audiences to affirm their belief in fairies in order to revive Tinker Bell, this can be interpreted as an affirmation of the willing suspension of disbelief thought to be an essential condition of theatrical spectating. However, closer analysis of the original 1904 production of Peter Pan, including its variation from conventional pantomime, reveals the intertext of two contemporaneous debates in ethnology: the idea that the last of the fairy folk were departing from Britain, and the more empirical observation that gypsy-tinkers were losing their rural way of life. This reveals Peter Pan's query as a reflection about the status of oppressed groups, and thus less an affirmation of innocence than a referendum on the desirability of modernity. This case study is postulated as an example of dramatic license—a previously under-theorized concept—proposing this as a term with specific referentiality to the theatrical medium, in which a mimetic, intellectual, and ideological problem is explicitly placed before an audience in order to elicit a response.

Dramatic License's next production is actually derived from a play about men.

DramaticLicenseProd (@DramaticLicense) | Twitter

The Great American Trailer Park Musical, the latest show by Dramatic License Productions, is a nutty little work that lampoons the denizens of its community, as well as a number of aspects of American culture, like the daytime reality TV shows made popular by the likes of Dr. Phil and . It may be short on plot, but the songs are generally catchy, the characters are sublimely absurd, and the jokes come fast and furious.

Dramatic License plans to run with that ball, through several kinds of presentations.

Dramatic License | Simply Novel Teachers Blog

Dramatic License leadership also includes managing director SaraEaton Hughes, box office manager Sarah Lynn Holt, and house managerand volunteer coordinator Pat Smith.