Le Havre Tour - Canadian Juno Beach and the memorial in Caen

The 9th Brigade consisting of the Highland Light Infantry, Stormont Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, and North Nova Scotia Highlanders regiments landed later in the morning and advanced through the lead brigades. The Sherbrooke Fusiliers tanks (27th Armoured Regiment) provided tank support.

Although a total of 14,000 Canadians stormed Juno Beach on D-Day, there were not more than three thousand young Canadians in the first wave - all ranks. The initial assault was the responsibility of four regiments with two additional companies supporting the flanks:
- North Shore Regiment on the left at St. Aubin (Nan Red beach)
- Queen's Own Rifles in the centre at Bernières (Nan White beach)
- Regina Rifles at Courseulles (Nan Green beach)
- Royal Winnipeg Rifles on the western edge of Courseulles (Mike Red and Mike Green beaches)
- a company of the Canadian Scottish secured the right flank
- a company of British, Royal Marine Commandos secured the left flank

Canadians storming Juno Beach on June 6, 1944

canadian forces juno beach normandy france juno beach normandy france

Canada Juno Beach WWII Memorial. Notice the Inukshuk?

On the Canadian Juno Beach, The Fort Garry Horse and the 1st Hussars were equipped with DD tanks, but only those of the 1st Hussars could be launched. They were assigned to the 7th Canadian Brigade, on the western end of the beach. Twenty-nine tanks were launched 800 yards (700 m) from the beach, twenty-one reached the shore. However, they only arrived after the first wave of infantry which consequently suffered heavy losses. Despite this, the tanks were able to destroy German defensive positions and Canadian troops soon advanced several miles inland. The 8th Canadian Brigade, on the eastern end of the beach, was forced to land without DD tanks because of rougher seas. They suffered heavy initial casualties, but were still able to make good progress.

The Canadian Juno Beach Center, Normandy

In the cases of the British Gold and Silver beaches and the Canadian Juno beach, these frogmen belonged to the 10 RN and Royal Marines Landing Craft Obstacle Clearance Units (LCOCUs).

Canadian cemetery Juno Beach Normandy June 2012
Canadian Juno Beach Centre, Bernières-sur-Mer

Canadian Juno Beach Memorial when I am older.

For those clients who want a day tour from Paris of the Normandy D Day beaches that focuses only on the British and/or Canadian Beaches, we provide D Day Tours from Paris that include visits that focus on Port Winston and the Debarkation Museum at Arromanches, the Canadian Juno Beach Center, and the haunting Canadian Cemetery at Beny-sur-Mer, or the British Cemeteries at Banneville la Campagne and/or Douvre la Delivrande, the Great Bunker in Ouistreham, as well as the Café Gondrée, the first building liberated in the invasion. We can conclude this British/Canadian Normandy D Day Tour with a visit at the Pegasus Memorial Museum, which is devoted to the exploits of British paratroopers in Operations Tonga and Overlord. Let us know your specific interests, and we will design your private Normandy D Day Tour to perfectly match your requirements.

On the first full day, our students visited the Canadian Juno Beach Museum, which was superb

Landing on the Canadian Juno Beach, No

The 9th Brigade consisting of the Highland Light Infantry, Stormont Dundas and Glengarry Highlanders, and North Nova Scotia Highlanders regiments landed later in the morning and advanced through the lead brigades. The Sherbrooke Fusiliers tanks (27th Armoured Regiment) provided tank support.

Although a total of 14,000 Canadians stormed Juno Beach on D-Day, there were not more than three thousand young Canadians in the first wave - all ranks. The initial assault was the responsibility of four regiments with two additional companies supporting the flanks:
- North Shore Regiment on the left at St. Aubin (Nan Red beach)
- Queen's Own Rifles in the centre at Bernières (Nan White beach)
- Regina Rifles at Courseulles (Nan Green beach)
- Royal Winnipeg Rifles on the western edge of Courseulles (Mike Red and Mike Green beaches)
- a company of the Canadian Scottish secured the right flank
- a company of British, Royal Marine Commandos secured the left flank

Thankfully there's not much tougher that a Canadian Juno Beach veteran

Juno Beach - The Canadian Encyclopedia

The background to this trip is that we, as a Branch of the Association, went to Normandy in 2007 and saw that there was nothing to mark the presence of 5th Kings or 8th Irish on Sword or Juno beaches respectively, where they had served as beach groups on D Day and beyond. By July 2009 we had arranged, supported by the Regimental family, including T Force, and the Mayor and council of Hermanville for a memorial to be unveiled at the 3 Division memorial site to commemorate 5 Kings. We had also placed a marker on Juno Beach at the Canadian Juno Beach Centre for 8th Irish.